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Dog Giardia

…Giardia should be treated. Other vets disagree. If a dog undergoes treatment, there are medications which can be taken, including Fendbendazole, a drug which will handle all sorts of other worms that could be in the dog. Metronidazole is another option but it has potentially serious side effects and is not guaranteed to work, having a limited success rate, curing no more than 70 percent of treated dogs. Fact is, there is no treatment option that…

Giardia

…as a result multiple stool samples are often required. Usually, veterinarians will require at least 3 stool samples and the diagnostic process can take as much as 7 to 10 days. There are two common antiprotozoal drugs, metronidazole and quinacrine, that are usually prescribed by veterinarians. Regardless of whether your animal is presenting symptoms of a Giardia infection, all animals that have been exposed to the protozoan should be treated. The…

Tetanus - Lockjaw

…for the diagnosis of tetanus. The animal’s appearance and history of the wound must be carefully considered. The veterinarian may use antibiotic therapy to kill the clostridia bacteria. Options include penicillin or metronidazole. Consideration of the side effects with long time use should be taken into account. Cleaning the wound and sedating the pet to control spasms and seizures will also benefit. Administering Acepromazine, a commonly used…

Dog Clostridium Perfringens

…to be sent to a reference lab to be tested.Treatment If the animal’s chronic diarrhea is caused by C. perfringens, it can be easily treated with antibiotics. Commonly used antibiotics include ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, erythromycin, and tylosin. Response to the antibiotics can usually be seen within days of beginning the medication, while the full course of treatment will typically last for a few weeks. A dog does not need treatment…

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