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Dog Glaucoma

…glaucoma.Types of Glaucoma The different types of glaucoma are pigmentary, open angle, closed angle, and goiodysgenis glaucoma. Glaucoma can be the primary disease or one that is the result of another disease process in the body of the dog or possibly even an eye injury. Some of the causative factors can be , trauma, advanced cataracts or detached retina.Signs and Symptoms Early symptoms of glaucoma are numerous. Your dog may have a severe…

Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis

…is a central nervous system disease that mostly affects dogs but can also be found in cats. An inflammatory disease that is known to be a form of meningoencephalitis, Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis is the second most common cause of inflammatory disease (next to encephalitis) of a dog’s central nervous system. Most common among young and middle aged female toy dogs, Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis progresses rapidly. Granulomatous…

Dog VKH Syndrome

…and changes in eye color. Chronic Uveitis may involve cataract formation or development of glaucoma that can also result in blindness. Hair loss can occur around eyes, muzzle and anus. The mucus membranes may seem crusty. Three to six months after the eye disease starts, dogs can experience a loss of pigmentation. Whitening of coats affects 90% of dogs. Poliosis may begin within two weeks of Uveitis and may take several months to develop as it…

Dog Cataracts

…an option. Glaucoma or even complete detachment of the retina from the eye may occur. Both of these are very serious conditions, with dire prospects for the dogs vision. Surgery should be done while cataracts are in the early stages but some dog owners dont realize that this is necessary and wait too long. Although surgery has rare risks, it can help dogs become happier and see better, just as they once did. Of course, all dogs need to be…

Dog Anterior Uvea Tumor

…or a visual change in the shape of the eye Your dog may also have and have a which leads to . They will not be as playful and will have an overall decrease in their activity.Diagnosis Your veterinarian will want a complete history of the occurrence. A physical exam will also be done. As part of the physical, the pupil of the eye will be examined for reaction to light. To rule-out glaucoma, the pressure of the eye will be checked. It is possible…

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